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20110301
20110331
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much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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